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Becoming Who We Are
Stories of Refugee Education

Becoming Who We Are

Logo https://unhcr.pageflow.io/becoming-who-we-are

Home

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Overview

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Statistics

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Barriers

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  • lack of infrastructure (especially in remote areas where refugees are often settled)
  • low availability of qualified teachers
  • language barriers
  • issues with certification
  • high cost of education, and
  • discrimination.
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Aisha and Amir

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Aisha, Amir and their peers have put together a list of needs for refugee learners in their community:
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Inclusion

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Girls' Education

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Connected Education

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Connected Education programmes have been rolled out by many Governments to mitigate the impact of school closures and support continued learning.
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As a result, she unfortunately did not pass her high-school final exam, like many of her peers.

Rachel is now taking a computer literacy course in Dzaleka camp, in Malawi, offered by UNHCR and its partner JRS.

Rachel wants to become a doctor. However, she has a long and winding road ahead to get back on track.
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Through this course, they are developing vital skills that can help accelerate their pathway to future studies, and allow them to participate in today's increasingly digital world.



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Higher Education

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Investments in higher education for refugees strengthen the national education systems in which they participate, to the benefit of host communities, students and institutions.
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He is a Master's graduate in Business Law, thanks to a scholarship offered by the French Embassy in Chad. For his bachelor's degree, he also received scholarship support from a Korean NGO.

In addition to his academic achievements, he is a founding member of Chad Innovation, an inclusive business incubator, was the President of N’Djamena's refugee student association, has worked at UNHCR's computer center... the list goes on. He currently lives in Chad's capital city of N'Djamena.

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"My studies in business law allowed me to meet people with an open mind. Studying really motivated me, opened my mind to new ideas and gave me social skills that I now use in my professional life. I dream big, because I want to change the lives of everyone around me."
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Durable and Far-Reaching Solutions

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Access to quality education not only benefits individual refugee children and youth but their families, communities, host countries and countries of origin.

The full cycle of education helps to develop critical thinking, problem solving and analytical skills that are applicable to daily life. It can also foster social cohesion, provide life-saving knowledge, improve health outcomes for families and address psychosocial needs.
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Resources & Credits

UNHCR Education 

'Coming Together For Refugee Education' – Education Report 2020

Refugee Education 2030: A Strategy for Refugee Inclusion (.pdf)

'Aiming Higher' Crowdfunding Campaign


Photographs, reporting, audio and web design by Antoine Tardy and text by Charlotte Jenner, for UNHCR.

© 2021 UNHCR – All rights reserved.
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Zara, 23, is in her final year of high-school and mother of Mahamat, 12 months

Every morning on school days, Zara is able to drop off Mahamat at a nursery attached to the camp’s high-school.

There are more than 20 such nurseries across 12 camps in eastern Chad, helping mothers to continue their education or careers as teachers.
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Mark has four children who are all studying.

In this photograph, he is 54. He was 25 when he fled Uganda.
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– Yvonne
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In 2012, “Dr Jonas” – as he is known across Kiziba and beyond – was chosen among 800 applicants for the DAFI scholarship and has proven worthy of the high expectations placed on him.

He is the very first refugee graduate in medicine not only in Kiziba but in the whole of Rwanda.
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Leah is a student in in Nursing and Midwifery. 

“I used to get sick frequently when I was a kid. With the help of nurses and doctors, I'm still alive today. There might be some other children who are going to survive just because of my help.”
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Justin is photographed here with his mother at home in Kigeme refugee camp, in Rwanda's Southern Province.

At the time, Justin was just about to start his Nursing studies at the Kigali Health Institute, on a DAFI scholarship.
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– Jean's father

At the time of this photograph, Jean was just about to start studying Civil Engineering at the University of Rwanda, on a DAFI scholarship.

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Cheri and Aline are both from Burundi. They named their son Exodus. 

Cheri recently graduated with a bachelor's in Public Health, on a DAFI scholarship.
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List of needs

  • More university opportunities for successful high-school students
  • Cultural and sports activities and media training
  • Special attention to secondary education
  • Connected Education opportunities, tools and resources for Connected Higher Education, including connectivity & smart devices
  • University opportunities in foreign countries for top students
  • Electricity
  • School uniforms
  • Scientific and educational laboratories
  • Libraries, cultural books
  • Fans and air conditioners in classrooms
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Enhakole

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Following support from Educate A Child and UNHCR – including provision of school fees, school materials and glasses, to help with her visual impairment – Enhakole completed her primary education and is now thriving at secondary school. Today she is one step closer to achieving her dream of becoming a doctor.
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Girls' Club

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The club was set up by JRS and UNHCR in 2018 to encourage girls to remain in school, highlight girls’ rights - particularly regarding education - provide sensitisation on issues impacting girls (such as gender-based violence), and build girls’ confidence to express themselves and their rights.

There are currently 50 girls who are part of the club – 30 in Milé camp and 20 in Kounoungou camp – who are working together to raise awareness and inspire other girls to pursue their education and claim their rights.

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"When we leave the classroom, we are told that we belong to the household, that it is not worth investing in girls' eduction. We do not agree."

Arafa Mohamad

"If a girl is willing and determined to succeed, she should be able to. But some of us give up because of the negative impact of prejudices."

Arafa Hamad

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Naweza

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It does so through the improvement of school facilities to create more girl-friendly environments (including appropriate sanitation facilities), raising awareness of the importance of girls’ education and supporting girls through after-school activities.
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Overview
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Chapter 1 Home

Becoming Who We Are

Chapter 3 Statistics

Chapter 4 Barriers

Chapter 5 Aisha and Amir

Chapter 6 Inclusion

Chapter 7 Girls' Education

Chapter 8 Connected Education

Chapter 9 Higher Education

Chapter 10 Durable and Far-Reaching Solutions

Chapter 11 Resources & Credits

Resources & Credits

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